Deanna Lush from AgCommunicators wins Churchill Fellowship

EXPLORER: Deanna Lush will leave Palmer behind when she heads overseas this year to research international agricultural communications. Photo: Supplied.

EXPLORER: Deanna Lush will leave Palmer behind when she heads overseas this year to research international agricultural communications. Photo: Supplied.

Nearly 16 years ago, Palmer resident Deanna Lush began her career in media at the Murray Valley Standard.

After two years, she moved on to the Stock Journal, before becoming media adviser for then Minister for Water Karlene Maywald, and eventually returning to Stock Journal as editor in 2010.

Today, she is the recipient of a Churchill Fellowship, taking her across the world to gather global research and develop her AgCommunicators business.

Deanna co-founded AgCommunicators in November 2013 to support the industry.

“Agriculture has a lot to offer; it’s very professional and tech savvy but it doesn’t always get seen that way so we help our clients to do that.

“Farmers are doing important work in feeding and clothing people around the world and I think the importance of that role gets forgotten sometimes.

“My background is ag; I grew up on a farm in Karoonda and went to school there so farming is what I know,” she said.

In just two years, the Adelaide-based company grew to twelve employees that work with clients across the country.

Deanna will travel to the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom later this year to investigate their communication, education and engagement methods to improve understanding of agriculture.

She said the aim was to explore how these countries engage producers in policy and advocacy groups, engage stakeholders and government decision-makers regarding what’s important to primary producers, and how they engage the general community in food production and where food comes from.

“I chose those three countries because they all have great programs that are already doing those three things.

“The project acknowledges the fact there’s an increasing urban-rural divide in Australia and consumers don’t necessarily understand where food comes from or the resources required to produce it.

“I’ll visit their programs and meet with those involved and bring back the information I gather to Australia,” she said.

By compiling her research, she will develop a public report for others to access and learn from her findings.

Agriculture has a lot to offer; it’s very professional and tech savvy but it doesn’t always get seen that way so we help our clients to do that - Deanna Lush

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