SA irrigators receive 100 per cent River Murray water allocation

South Australian Irrigators will receive the full 100 per cent water allocation for 2017/18, thanks to the highest flows in the River Murray for 23 years.

The opening 100 per cent allocation follows high rainfall in spring and the state’s wettest summer since 1937.

It means South Australia is now expected to receive its full State Entitlement Flow of 1,850 gigalitres.

The opening allocation for 2016/17 in South Australia was as low as 36 per cent before it progressed to 100 by August last year.

Minister for Water and the River Murray Ian Hunter said the allocation would give local water users some certainty in making their decisions for 2017-18.

He warned that potentially dry months ahead could impact the allocation for 2018/19.

“Last year South Australia’s River Murray experienced the highest flows in 23 years. But as widely known, the wettest months can quickly revert to drier times,” he said.

“Water users should be aware that some climate models are forecasting potentially dry conditions in 2017, which could affect water availability in 2018-19.”

The Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) is responsible for administering water trade in South Australia.

Each year, DEWNR release an allocation to share, conserve and manage the volume of River Murray water available to South Australia and other states.

Managing South Australia’s water responsibly contributes to achieving long-lasting benefits for the River Murray and water users, including our cities and towns, primary producers, industry, recreational users and the environment.

Private carryover, which refers to excess water carried over from previous allocations, will not be made available and granted in 2017-18

Instead, the carryover will be kept for dryer years in the future when water allocations will be restricted.

For more information, head to DEWNR’s website.

Water users should be aware that some climate models are forecasting potentially dry conditions in 2017, which could affect water availability in 2018-19 - Ian Hunter

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