Wellington mosaics unveiled at Baker Reserve | PHOTOS

The sound of Owen Love's didgeridoo echoed through the mist at Wellington on Saturday morning, calling spirits past and present and people of all cultures together at Baker Reserve.

The unveiling of four mosaics on a toilet block there was about more than a new bit of art, said Wellington Progress Association member Vicki Crowley.

It was the telling of the town's story, she said, and a new connection between its residents and the area's traditional owners.

"It is very special and a significant moment of generosity, and one I did not ever think I would get to experience," she said in a speech on the day.

"It is also about ruwe and ngatji: knowing country, family, community and place.

"It is about the treasure that flows behind, Moorundi, a water system and spirit that we can't live without.

"It's about Wellington today and its ancient being."

The mosaics were commissioned by the Wellington Progress Association on the suggestion of Eileen Newber and Jennifer Wightman.

Planning began last March, and several dozen people were involved in brainstorming images to include or the finicky task of assembling tiles on the boards.

In all, Ms Crowley estimated, more than 1000 hours had been spent on the project.

A panel by artist Rosslyn Richards shows Ponde, the cod hunted by Ngurunderi in the Ngarrindjeri creation story.

Three more panels show the history of Wellington: the hotel and courthouse, steam boats and the ferry on the river, pelicans and a sunrise.

They were unveiled by Ms Richards, Murray Bridge Councillors Karen Eckermann and Fred Toogood, and Mayor Brenton Lewis.

Ms Crowley thanked Member for Hammond Adrian Pederick, council representatives and employees and members of the reconciliation group Ngoppon Together for their contributions to the project; Steve Morcombe and the many locals who had worked on it; and the visitors, family members and friends who came to the unveiling.

Locals enjoyed drinks and a sausage sizzle afterwards.