Kai Martin crusades against domestic violence in Murray Bridge

Agent of change: Kai Martin gives a presentation about domestic violence at Murray Bridge's Independent Learning Centre. Photo: Supplied.

Agent of change: Kai Martin gives a presentation about domestic violence at Murray Bridge's Independent Learning Centre. Photo: Supplied.

Young men's attitudes need to change if domestic violence is to be stopped, recent campaigns have argued, but that change has to start somewhere.

Murray Bridge teenager Kai Martin has been opening eyes among his peers this year by focusing on the issue for his school studies.

"Now all my friends ... look at domestic violence as an issue, say 'Kai's really into (preventing) that, this is a serious issue'," he said.

"They didn't realise this was happening in Murray Bridge – you see it on the news every couple of years – and how preventable it is."

He helped organise Murray Bridge's domestic violence awareness days in July, designed a pamphlet that will be distributed at future events, and attended meetings of White Ribbon and the Murray Bridge Regional Collaboration on Violence Against Women and Children.

He also sold beanies and created displays at his school and workplace to illustrate the fact that any form of domestic violence is unacceptable, and that it might be happening just next door.

In a speech at the Independent Learning Centre on Thursday, he spoke about having been taken to anti-violence events since he was a little boy.

"I have attended the vigil many times, and the White Ribbon Day, but the 28th and 29th (of July) was new to me this year," he said.

"I learnt a lot about our community ... I learnt a lot about the ups and a lot about the downs, and a lot about the people behind the scenes who are really trying to make a movement.

"This experience has meant a lot more to me than I originally thought.

"I invested myself a lot more than I thought I would."

He hoped there would come a time when all teenagers would realise disrespecting women was not on.

White Ribbon committee member Heather Courtney said Kai was the youngest person she knew of to get involved in the movement.

"We're very happy to have him on board," she said.

"He was very committed and would really work hard."