Dukes Highway speed cameras almost ready

Watch your speed: Point-to-point cameras will soon be in operation on the Dukes Highway between Coonalpyn and Ki Ki.
Watch your speed: Point-to-point cameras will soon be in operation on the Dukes Highway between Coonalpyn and Ki Ki.

POINT-TO-POINT speed cameras along the Dukes Highway will be turned on as soon as signage is put up.

The cameras will measure drivers' speed at Coonalpyn and Ki Ki and calculate their average speed over the distance between the towns.

Coonalpyn Police Station officer-in-charge Stan Lowcock warned the cameras would be operational when signage was put in place.

"I'm not sure of the exact date when our Ki Ki and Coonalpyn cameras will be activated," he said.

"But don't worry - signage will be in place to forewarn motorists that the cameras are up and running."

He said speeding on Australia's highways continued to be a major cause of road crashes and trauma, which continually worried country communities.

In an attempt to diminish road incidents new technologies such as average speed cameras are being introduced throughout Australia to help reduce speeding and improve road safety, particularly in rural areas.

Average speed cameras are being strategically positioned on segments of high risk inner rural arterial roads, based on risk and exposure to incident.

Reductions in average travel speed on roads is the most effective and swift way to reduce road trauma and produces significant and immediate road safety benefits.

A reduction of five kilometres per hour, in average travel speed, will reduce rural casualty crashes by almost 30 per cent.

Average speed detection modifies the behaviour of drivers over long sections of road, assists with traffic flow and reduces speeding that results in overall improved road safety in the area.

New South Wales and Victoria currently use average speed safety cameras, with Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory, Queensland and Western Australia following closely behind.

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