Whyalla residents are being treated as 'second class citizens'

COURT HOUSE: Liberal Candidate for Giles Bernadette Abraham said Whyalla residents are being treated as second class citizens after a recent move by the state government which no longer allows local residents to deal or pay with fines at the local courthouse.
COURT HOUSE: Liberal Candidate for Giles Bernadette Abraham said Whyalla residents are being treated as second class citizens after a recent move by the state government which no longer allows local residents to deal or pay with fines at the local courthouse.

Whyalla residents are being treated as 'second class citizens' according to Liberal candidate for Giles Bernadette Abraham, after a recent move by the state government.

Fines can no longer be paid or dealt with at the Whyalla Courthouse, instead residents who wish to appeal or organise payments for their fines will be required to call the Attorney General's office, fines enforcement and recovery unit .

Shadow Attorney General Stephen Wade visited Whyalla recently supporting Liberal candidate for Giles Bernadette Abraham in the upcoming state election when the issue was raised to them both.

Mrs Abraham said as the new arrangements only were implemented last Monday, February 3 and the full impact on residents would become more clear over time.

"I'm concerned there will be a detrimental impact on the people of Whyalla," Mrs Abraham said.

"The new arrangements are just another example of the Labor government making Adelaide-centric policies with little thought as to how those decisions will impact on people living in the regions."

Before the changes, regional South Australian residents could make arrangements to pay their fines at the local courthouse.

The courts will now have a limited capacity to make arrangements for payment and only for court imposed fines.

In Adelaide, people will be able to go to the fines unit office and discuss their situation and arrange payment plans with the assistance of courthouse administration staff.

"With courthouses no longer allowed to offer this service, country South Australians will not have the same opportunity," Mrs Abraham said.

"There is no reason why the people of Whyalla should have a lesser service than the people of Adelaide."

Mrs Abraham said it would be when people were struggling to make arrangements to pay a fine that problems would arise.

"The new arrangements will force people to go through a 1800 number, rather than go down to their local court and discuss their case face-to-face, documents in hand," she said.

"I am concerned that over the phone it makes it harder for people to make their case and put in place fair arrangements.

"These changes come on top of justice portfolio budget cuts which fall heavily on country South Australia."

The Supreme Court will only sit in Adelaide and country circuits of the District Court will be reduced to 25 per cent.

"Clearly, the Weatherill Labor government regards country South Australians as second class citizens," Mrs Abraham said.

"The people of Whyalla need a Liberal member in a Steven Marshall government to stand up for them."

Payments for fines can still be made at Australia Post and Service SA.

This story Whyalla residents are being treated as 'second class citizens' first appeared on Whyalla News.