Palmer wind farm draws protesters' ire

Long fight: Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton, helps John DelFabbro and Mick Tamblyn, both of Palmer, to protest against the proposed Palmer Wind Farm.
Long fight: Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton, helps John DelFabbro and Mick Tamblyn, both of Palmer, to protest against the proposed Palmer Wind Farm.
Long fight: Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton, helps Mick Tamblyn and John DelFabbro, both of Palmer, to protest against the proposed Palmer Wind Farm.

Long fight: Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton, helps Mick Tamblyn and John DelFabbro, both of Palmer, to protest against the proposed Palmer Wind Farm.

Long fight: John DelFabbro and Mick Tamblyn, both of Palmer, protest against the proposed Palmer Wind Farm with help from Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton.

Long fight: John DelFabbro and Mick Tamblyn, both of Palmer, protest against the proposed Palmer Wind Farm with help from Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton.

Long fight: John DelFabbro, of Palmer, Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton and Mick Tamblyn, also of Palmer, protest together to stop the proposed Palmer Wind Farm.

Long fight: John DelFabbro, of Palmer, Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton and Mick Tamblyn, also of Palmer, protest together to stop the proposed Palmer Wind Farm.

NOISE, visual, Aboriginal heritage and animal safety issues were just some of the complaints local residents voiced at the final Palmer Wind Farm information day on Thursday.

More than 80 people turned out to study the amended wind farm plans, made public at Collier Park Pavilion, and have their final say before TrustPower handed in a development application to the Mid Murray Council.

Expert TrustPower consultants spent the afternoon answering questions and explaining amendments which had been made to meet the concerns of Palmer residents.

Despite holding three consultation days, two workshops and attending more than 100 one-on-one meetings, Palmer resident John DelFabbro said TrustPower was not getting the message.

"We don't want them," he said.

"(TrustPower) approached me to have them on my land twice and I said no."

The proposal states landowners would receive payments in excess of $10,000 for hosting a single turbine on their property.

But a sum like that still did not make it attractive for some.

"I was never once tempted," Mr Delfabbro said.

"It's vandalism to the countryside.

"They are going to effect the whole property, not only the visual but the sound too."

Mr DelFabbro purchased his "beautiful" 1100 hectare Palmer property to run as a private conservation park.

"Some of the places they want to put them (turbines) on are the prettiest places around Palmer," he said.

"It's pretty rough when you buy a property to conserve and these start popping up all around you."

Erwin Thaller, of Keyneton, also stood firm against the wind farm establishment and said it would ruin his business, Wyandah Cutting Horses.

"I'm devastated," he said.

"We will have wind farms both sides of us, it'll finish my 40 horses and they (TrustPower) don't care."

"To have this disturbance and invasion of peace is going to send my horses through the roof, my foals will go through the fences."

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