Birds of a feather are flocking together

Flocking together: Curlew sandpipers gather at Lake Alexandrina. Photo - Peter Koch
Flocking together: Curlew sandpipers gather at Lake Alexandrina. Photo - Peter Koch

Across the Lower Lakes and in the wetlands below Lock 1, bird numbers are continuing to rise.

From Blanchetown to Lakes Alexandrina and Albert, birds have been flocking to the wetlands since March because of a controlled lowering of water levels.

Lowered levels has exposed mudflats, which in turn, has brought thousands of migratory birds to the area to feast on bugs, plants and the like.

Department for Environment and Water (DEW) spokesperson Adrienne Rumbelow said the number of migratory birds such as curlew sandpipers, stilts and the rare white-rumped sandpiper had gathered around Tolderol Game Reserve, on Lake Alexandrina, in record numbers.

“The mudflats provide a good feed for these migratory birds before the long flight to their northern-hemisphere breeding grounds,” Ms Rumbelow said.

“We’ve also found rare plants such as mud mats and mud worts growing on the exposed mudflats.

“These plants can help to improve future water clarity.” 

She said the department would continue to monitor vegetation and animal life in the area.

“We are looking forward to additional flows in winter and spring which will see water levels increase, providing breeding cues for many species of threatened fish and frogs,” Ms Rumbelow said.

Environmental water is being provided by the Commonwealth Environmental Water Holder to support freshwater releases to the Coorong.