Murray Bridge High was the only school in the state to get more than one syndicate in the top 10 during the recent ASX Sharemarket Game

TRADERS: Murray Bridge High School students Jack Jacobs, Kaleb Brine and Wei Liu all placed in the top 10, out of 800 syndicates from SA, who took part in the ASX Sharemarket Game. Photo: Emma Zirkel.
TRADERS: Murray Bridge High School students Jack Jacobs, Kaleb Brine and Wei Liu all placed in the top 10, out of 800 syndicates from SA, who took part in the ASX Sharemarket Game. Photo: Emma Zirkel.

Three students at Murray Bridge High School are celebrating their recent success in the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) Sharemarket Game after they each secured a top 10 position out of 800 syndicates in South Australia.

Year nine student Wei Liu placed sixth after sitting at fourth with only a week to go before the competition closed.

Year eight student Kaleb Brine secured seventh position after being ranked fifth just one day prior and year 10 student Jack Jacobs made it into the top 10 at ninth place, without logging into the game for the last four weeks.

Maths and science teacher Ross Groocock said the students were to be commended for their efforts as each one made a profit on the $50,000 worth of virtual money they received.

“With only four weeks to go about four per cent of syndicates in the nation were in profit, which provided a great opportunity to talk about the dangers of losing money if you manage your portfolio sensibly,” he said.

Mr Groocock said the game provides a tool to help teach students about investing and the sharemarket.

Fellow maths and science teacher Fiona Rabone added that there was only one one school that got more than one syndicate in the top 10 syndicates in South Australia, and that was Murray Bridge. 

“Everyone sort of has their own tactic when it comes to the buying and selling shares, there are no rules but it teaches students real life skills about how the economy operates,” she said.

“The prices students buy and sell at are the same as they would get in the live market.”