Murray Bridge North School invited guests to help them celebrate the official opening of their STEM facility

Students and staff of Murray Bridge North School (MBNS) were joined by guests, including Minister for Education John Gardner, for the official opening of the school’s science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) facility on Thursday.

MBNS STEM coordinator Tiahne Wareing said the facility would enable students to engage further in the subject.

“We opened the STEM learning area earlier this year and the students have been working on a whole range of projects: anything from 3-D printing, to sphereos and robotics ,” she said.

“We have also been doing a lot of cross age tutoring between the upper and junior primary years to really get use of the space.

“With the STEM works funding we have been able to provide the students with many experiences they might not have had before.

LEARN: State Minister for Education John Gardner with Murray Bridge North School students Nicholas and Rakibul in the new STEM facility.

LEARN: State Minister for Education John Gardner with Murray Bridge North School students Nicholas and Rakibul in the new STEM facility.

“We have purchased a range of technology from laptops, iPads and robotics. The space has allowed us to do more training and development with teachers and do group work with more than one class.”

Student STEM ambassadors Hailie and Harshita said their roles enabled them to develop leadership skills and share knowledge with other schools.

“We get to take part in exciting things and meet some really cool people involved in STEM,” Hailie said.

Harshita added she loved how diverse STEM was and how many careers in STEM fields students could pursue after they had finished school.

The Minister for Education, John Gardner, told The Standard STEM works was an important area of focus for the state government to provide professional development to teachers so that STEM skills could be offered to students.

“We want students to choose science and mathematics based subjects when they go into high school because the jobs of the future, many of which don’t even exist yet, will require STEM skills,” he said.

“The state government’s view is that every child should have the same opportunities to excel in life and in their schooling.”

Executive director, learning improvement Susan Cameron said the contemporary facilities at MBNS would support cutting edge-teaching and learning approaches that build high quality learning that brings together science, mathematics and technologies.

“The new spaces are flexible to foster both collaborative and individual learning opportunities,” she said.

“STEM knowledge and skills will enable the students to be well equipped for their pathways through everyday life and future work.”