Two pieces of equipment will benefit patients at Murray Bridge Hospital, thanks to a generous grant

THANKFUL: Trevor Wynne is a patient at the renal dialysis unit at the Murray Bridge Hospital, with clinical nurse Killiana Mafara. Photo: Emma Zirkel.
THANKFUL: Trevor Wynne is a patient at the renal dialysis unit at the Murray Bridge Hospital, with clinical nurse Killiana Mafara. Photo: Emma Zirkel.

Murray Bridge Hospital (MBH) is among the regional hospitals set to benefit from a funding boost thanks to a grant from the Hospital Research Foundation.

Country Health SA (CHSA) chief executive officer, Maree Geraghty, said the grant, worth more than $400,000, would enable more country South Australians to be treated closer to home.

“The $406,785 grant from the Hospital Research Foundation is a fantastic and generous gesture, which will enable CHSA to purchase vital equipment for our hospitals.  

Country Health SA’s executive director of medical services, Doctor Hendrika Meyer, said the funding was being used to purchase equipment in the areas of cardiovascular care, renal, birthing and diabetes.

“Enabling country patients to receive ongoing care close to home and loved ones is a key focus for Country Health SA,” she said.

Thanks to the funding the Murray Bridge Hospital will receive two pieces of equipment: a continuous glucose monitoring system for patients with diabetes and a pedal exercise machine for renal dialysis patients. 

Trevor Wynne has been a patient at the renal dialysis unit in Murray Bridge for the last four years – Mr Wynne has received the treatment for over 30 years – and said he looked forward to using the pedal machine. 

Mr Wynne said the pedal machine would help patients while they are receiving dialysis in a number of ways.

“These bikes will really help the patients while they are receiving dialysis,” he said. 

"When you're just sitting there for hours at a time you're not moving much and having these bikes will allow for a better dialysis.

"When you get to the last hour or so you start to become restless and you just want to move.

"It’s something really useful for people to do to get their mind off the dialysis and break up the monotony."

Clinical nurse Killiana Mafara said it was great that Murray Bridge Hospital would receive the pedal exercise machine as it would greatly benefit patients in the unit.

“When our patients receive treatment they are sedentary for a minimum of four hours and these pedal bikes will help them when they need to move blood through the body and get their heart rate up,” she said.

“Most of the patients are sleeping or reading while receiving dialysis so it will be good for them to take their minds off it and break up the time a bit.

“This will benefit them so much. We are really grateful for this.”