Letters to the editor, January 8, 2019

Photo worth 1000 words: Paul Smith sent this photo of a visitor to his Mannum garden. Send your pics to peri.strathearn@fairfaxmedia.com.au.
Photo worth 1000 words: Paul Smith sent this photo of a visitor to his Mannum garden. Send your pics to peri.strathearn@fairfaxmedia.com.au.

Murray Bridge needs a New Year’s Eve celebration

Every year that I have lived in Murray Bridge – 10 now – hundreds of parents, especially those new to the area or who have had children recently, inquire on our community pages about what to do on New Year’s Eve.

Considering the turn-out for the Christmas pageant, I can’t understand why the council hasn’t taken the initiative to deliver any events for local families.

I know they are making a huge effort with the new Splash Festival, but I’ve lived in tiny blink towns like Port Wakefield and Beaut with about 500 people that still put on something for the locals.

Emily Negrin, Murray Bridge

Greyhound comparison was misleading

It is extremely misleading of Matt Corby, chief executive officer of Greyhound Racing SA (GRSA), to compare the killing of surplus greyhounds with the euthanasia of some stray dogs by RSPCA South Australia (“CEO defends racing industry”, November 13).

It is a sad fact that some stray and surrendered dogs come into our care in shocking physical and/or mental condition.

Euthanasia is the only humane option we have for these animals, who are suffering because of the actions or inaction of others, usually their owners.

They are not in this hopeless condition because of anything RSPCA has done.

In contrast, the killing of greyhounds is the result of an oversupply situation wholly created by the greyhound racing industry.

The business model of greyhound racing relies on an endless supply of new dogs to fill racing quotas.

There is not an endless supply of people ready to give all these dogs – many of which never make it to a track – a new home.

Furthermore, if the only greyhounds killed are – as Mr Corby claims – “those whose temperaments did not suit them to home life”, the bulk of blame lies in the lives most greyhounds are forced to live.

Greyhounds have the same care needs as any other breed of dog.

Long periods of confinement and isolation, lack of socialisation and training methods all contribute to behaviour conditioning that can make it hard for greyhounds to adjust to life as family pets.

In an industry primarily focussed on increasing gambling revenue, greyhounds are the unlucky pawns.

Paul Stevenson, RSPCA South Australia

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