Mypolonga Institute to host market, car boot sale

Irene Hughes reclines out the front of the Mypolonga Institute, which will host a farmers' market and car boot sale this Sunday. Photo: Peri Strathearn.
Irene Hughes reclines out the front of the Mypolonga Institute, which will host a farmers' market and car boot sale this Sunday. Photo: Peri Strathearn.

A farmers' market and car boot sale are planned at the Mypolonga Institute this Sunday for the 100th anniversary of an important step in its establishment.

The land on which the hall is set was allotted a century ago this month, following a flood which reshaped the early development of the town.

From 10am on Sunday, up to a dozen stalls will sell local honey, jams, dried fruit, plants, art, woodwork and more, and about 15 residents will sell goods from the boot of their cars.

The local Country Fire Service brigade will cook up bacon and eggs, and morning tea will also be available.

The Mypolonga Shukokai Karate Alliance will stage a demonstration at 10.30am and host a come-and-try session at 11.30, and guitarist Anne Todd will provide background music.

Photos and information about the town's history will also be on display, and visitors will be able to make donations towards a new path at the front of the Institute, which will be made of bricks bearing the names of the early settlers and their descendants.

Historian Irene Hughes said the Institute had played an important role in the town over the past century.

"The kids that have come back and brought their families here to live, they love the place," she said.

"It's part of their school memories ... it does mean a lot to a lot of people."

She hoped that some of the town's younger residents would be able to keep its history alive long after the older generation departed, just as she had done years ago when she interviewed many of the children of the first European settlers.

"To me it's really important that it's saved," she said.

"We just want some of the young ones to come in.

"That's my vision: that some of the young ones will step in as some of us old ones step out."

Like the nearby Anglican Church, the Institute was originally going to be built down by the river, but the early settlers discovered in 1917 that they would need to move to higher ground.

A timber-framed iron shed known as the Recreation Hall, a former railway store filled with petrol cans for seats, was relocated to the site in 1920.

It took another decade for the settlers to raise the £1200 needed to construct something more permanent.

State MP John Cowan, later Sir John, laid the foundation stone for the present building in October 1928, and it opened on March 16, 1929 with an ugly man competition and fete.

  • More information: Jenni 0419 032 331.

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