NAIDOC Week 2019: Hundreds walk together through Murray Bridge to awards ceremony | PHOTOS

The most inspiring nungas in Ngarrindjeri country have been recognised at a NAIDOC Week awards ceremony in Murray Bridge.

More than 250 people walked together across the city's old road bridge to the ceremony in celebration of Aboriginal history, culture and achievements.

After arriving at the council office, the Deadly Nannas sang, flags were raised and a minute's silence observed before 10 awards were handed out.

Fran Lovegrove was recognised as male elder of the year for his involvement in numerous committees which worked to benefit the community, for his mentorship and his tireless work for community causes.

His daughter Danielle accepted a trophy on his behalf.

Lena Rigney was named female elder of the year for her volunteer storytelling and arts and craft work, both in schools and elsewhere; and for writing a book which will be published by Scholastic next year.

She briefly thanked the crowd for the honour: "gee, this is unexpected".

For contributing to his school community through classes and extra-curricular activities, including didgeridoo lessons and a nunga choir, Rayne Smith was recognised as male youth of the year.

Another classroom leader, Tarsha Humprey, was named female youth of the year for having overcome challenges, recorded consistent attendence and become a fine role model.

The driving force behind a National Reconciliation Week event in Murray Bridge, Headspace's Anthony Wilson, was named worker of the year.

Mr Wilson applied for and won a Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal grant for the event, gained support from local service providers and welcomed children from almost every local school to Sturt Reserve on May 31.

Carer of the year was Mark Elliott, for his advocacy for the development and enhancement of Aboriginal services, and for aiding collaboration between those services, local government and health services.

Young rugby and football player Lachlan Miller received the sportsperson of the year award for including and encouraging those around him in school and, more recently, South Australian representative sides.

Emcee Steve Sumner described him as a superstar in the making: "he's a little flyweight, he must be a gun".

A junior encouragement award went to Dommy Colmer for helping younger students at school and including them in games, for welcoming teachers and classmates in language every day, for respecting himself and others, and for always having a smile on his face.

Deadly Nanna Sandy Wilson accepted an artist of the year award given to the women's singing group.

"We do what we do because we want to do it, not because there's an award at the end of it, so this has come as a nice surprise," she said.

Chair Vicki Hartman accepted an award given to the Moorundi Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service, organisation of the year.

"I've only been there a couple of years and ... I've just seen the place grow," she said.

"It's a really nice environment to visit if you want to get involved in the programs they have running."

Michael Sedgman, Vicki Hartman, Brenton Lewis, Sandy Wilson, Dommy Colmer, Anthony Wilson, Lachlan Miller, Steve Sumner, Tarsha Humphrey, Danielle Lovegrove, Rayne Smith, Georgina Trevorrow and Lena Rigney celebrate NAIDOC Week 2019 in Murray Bridge.

Michael Sedgman, Vicki Hartman, Brenton Lewis, Sandy Wilson, Dommy Colmer, Anthony Wilson, Lachlan Miller, Steve Sumner, Tarsha Humphrey, Danielle Lovegrove, Rayne Smith, Georgina Trevorrow and Lena Rigney celebrate NAIDOC Week 2019 in Murray Bridge.

Mayor Brenton Lewis said it was important to recognise both elders and young people at times such as NAIDOC Week, recognising the truths of the past and the potential of the future.

"Lasting and effective agreements (between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people) cannot be achieved unless we have a shared truthful understanding of the nature of the dispute, the history," he said.

"The true story of colonisation must be told.

"But I don't think we should dwell too long on things that happened in the past that were very regretful.

"What we can do is influence the future.

"Going forward, working together, building on respect (for each other), is what is going to make this community better."

The ceremony was followed by a family fun day at Ninkowar, between the bridges, featuring food, music, stalls and activities for children.

More activities will take place around the Murraylands today and throughout the rest of the week, originally named for the National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee.

This year's NAIDOC Week theme is "voice, treaty, truth".

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