Impact of COVID-19 (coronavirus) felt throughout Murraylands

"It's been a tough couple of years and we were just staring to see fresh growth and return on investment, and along comes a world virus," says Rural City of Murray Bridge mayor Brenton Lewis.
"It's been a tough couple of years and we were just staring to see fresh growth and return on investment, and along comes a world virus," says Rural City of Murray Bridge mayor Brenton Lewis.

The Murraylands' belated economic recovery has been dealt a blow.

Rural City of Murray Bridge Mayor Brenton Lewis said with food production being one of the district's biggest industries, it was not possible for a big group of locals to work from home because of the coronavirus crisis and he hoped businesses would not close completely.

"We are not immune. We will be affected in quite a similar way to other regions," he said.

"It has been a tough couple of years and we were just starting to see fresh growth and return on investment, and along comes a world virus."

The impact of COVID-19, also known as coronavirus, is being felt by the Murraylands in more ways than one.

With Premier Steven Marshall announcing on Sunday, March 22, that the state's borders would close at 4pm on Tuesday, March 24, many are wondering how they will see their loved ones interstate during the crisis.

"The health of South Australians is unquestionably our number one priority and that is why we are acting swiftly and decisively to protect them from the impact of the disease," Mr Marshall said.

"The state government will continue to follow the advice of the state's leading medical experts to roll out a strong plan to mitigate the economic and health threats posed by coronavirus."

Anyone entering the state - including residents - must self-isolate for 14 days from their arrival. There will be exemptions for essential travellers including those needing to maintain health, those in the food supply chain, and other situations to help with the state's economic needs.

The restrictions were recommended by SA Chief Public Health Officer Nicola Spurrier in an effort to delay community transmission of the virus.

"We also need the community to work together, and everyone to do the right thing in terms of practising appropriate hand hygiene and social distancing measures," Associate Professor Spurrier said.

Married couple Alisha Hele and Josh Curmi won't see each other for an indefinite amount of time due to the state's border closures.

Married couple Alisha Hele and Josh Curmi won't see each other for an indefinite amount of time due to the state's border closures.

Murray Bridge woman Alisha Hele, whose husband Josh Curmi lives in Melbourne's western suburbs, said the news was initially hard to process, but believed it had to be done.

"It has to be done to slow the spread; as much as it puts strain on people like us, it's necessary and we understand that action was needed," she said.

"The day we get to see each other will probably be better than my wedding day."

Many businesses throughout the region are closing their doors temporarily as part of further measures announced by the government.

For the latest advice about coronavirus, visit www.health.sa.gov.au

Comments