Taree Sansbury highlights cultural heritage and family in new SA docuseries In Four Worlds

POWERFUL: Taree Sansbury's impact story will feature in a new docuseries to air on free television this month. Photo: Supplied
POWERFUL: Taree Sansbury's impact story will feature in a new docuseries to air on free television this month. Photo: Supplied

Prominent performing arts star Taree Sansbury shares how she looks forward to representing her cultural heritage and further breaking down indigenous stigma in a new documentary to air this month.

The dancer and choreographer, whose bloodlines extend to Kaurna, Narungga and Ngarrindjeri nations, is set to connect with new audiences in a television docuseries, In Four Worlds.

She is one of four regional South Australian artists handpicked for the project to share their impact stories on a national platform.

Produced by Country Arts SA, the docuseries airs on SBS on November 12.

For Taree the opportunity means sharing her take on Australia's diverse culture.

"I feel like today there's still a stereotype of what indigenous looks like and where the people come from," she explained.

"It's good that there are a variety of these types of stories out there representing all the different mobs across Australia."

"I feel really strongly about representing where my cultural heritage comes from and I like to involve that in my work, as it means pretty much everything to me."

I feel really strongly about representing where my cultural heritage comes from and I like to involve that in my work, as it means pretty much everything to me.

Taree Sansbury

Describing her work in the film as "a lovely story of family", Taree explained how it is close to home with a cross-generational emphasis.

"Even if it doesn't appear that way in the film, as it's not mentioned, for me it involves my nieces, now I have nephews who weren't around at the time of filming, and then it goes as far up as my mum's mum."

"It's really nice to be able to show that and show my artistic practice, and also what was really nice was being able to film in different parts of Adelaide that are special to me, this includes Goolwa beach," she said.

She further highlights her nanna, who lives in Victor Harbor, and her influences.

Taree's debut in the film further extends to another local documentary involving her younger sister, also a dancer.

"We have a few dancers in the family and I went and studied with my other sister who is two years younger than me," she explained.

"The other project centred around that relationship."

The freelance artist and NAISDA Dance College graduate, who calls SA home, is currently based on the Gold Coast and is focused on creating a co-city practice between the two.

"I am trying to figure out what that means and how I can form a dual city type of exchange."

"It's something quite in the future but always in the back of my mind and my partner's always looking for opportunities to engage with having a performance in Adelaide or creating a partnership there," she said.

SUCCESS: Taree recently became associate artistic director of new performing arts company Karul Projects, which is the umbrella of her main works. Photo: Supplied

SUCCESS: Taree recently became associate artistic director of new performing arts company Karul Projects, which is the umbrella of her main works. Photo: Supplied

Despite COVID-19 knocking a few of her plans, Taree is geared to be part of the Fringe Festival in 2021.

More recently she performed in Thomas E.S. Kelly's work [MIS]CONCEIVE in the Living Ritual Festival Toronto/ APAM 2018/ Supercell Dance Festival, SHIFTING SHAPES at PACT and CO_EX_EN at Dance Massive 2019.

Unsurprisingly, she recently became associate artistic director of new performing arts company Karul Projects which is the umbrella of her main works.

Moving through the performing arts ranks, she has managed to work with some of Australia's highly acclaimed independent makers such as Vicki Van Hout, Martin Del Amo, Victoria Hunt and with companies Force Majeure and Branch Nebula.

More locally, in 2019 she featured in the Murraylands NAIDOC Week celebrations where her work reflected on the history, culture and achievements of the region's Aboriginal people, with emphasis on Ngarrindjeri weaving.

Joining her in the documentary is visual artist James Dodd from the Riverland, actor Sarah Brokensha, Broken Hill and Aboriginal photographer Lavene Ngatokorua, Whyalla.

Each share what impact place has in their art making and shaping their lives to be the artists they are today.

Country Arts SA chief executive and executive producer Anthony Peluso said the series was a way to share with the rest of the nation what regional SA has to offer.

"We have always known that regional and remote South Australia is home to many talented artists, and now we are thrilled to be able to share some of these stories with a nationwide audience," he said.

"Each of these artists brings their own perspective to their region and in turn we see how their surroundings have influenced their art."

In Four Worlds features on SBS, Thursday, November 12 at 3pm.