Monarto Safari Park baby boom, relocation program

There has been some cuteness overload at the Monarto Safari Park with new babies being delivered over the past few days.

The carnivore team has an overnight surprise with the birth of twins to Forest, a 13-year-old spotted hyaena.

Keeper Kat Ferres said the team arrived for work on Tuesday morning and discovered Forest had given birth overnight.

"Since Tuesday, Forest has been spending the majority of the time in her den just as she would in the wild," she said.

Forest has been doing a great job looking after her cubs - we have seen the cubs suckling and we've also seen her bring out the cubs to introduce them to Dad, Gamba."

The baby boom continues at the Monarto Safari Park with new babies making an appearance recently. Photo - supplied.

The baby boom continues at the Monarto Safari Park with new babies making an appearance recently. Photo - supplied.

On Wednesday, 20-year-old giraffe Myeisha gave birth to a calf in the waterhole exhibit.

The sex of the baby is still not known but keepers are watching closely to make sure mother and baby continue to do well.

Also a feisty zebra colt was born mid-October, and he is proving to be a lively, excitable foal.

He is currently being monitored in an area of the park which is off-limits to vistors, but will be moved to the Wild Africa exhibit in the future.

The baby boom continues at the Monarto Safari Park with new babies making an appearance recently. Photo - supplied.

The baby boom continues at the Monarto Safari Park with new babies making an appearance recently. Photo - supplied.

Stick-nest rats released in wild

As part of a breeding program at the safari park, about 40 greater stick-nest rats have been released in protected area in the Mallee Cliffs National Park in New South Wales.

Once widespread across the southern deserts of Australia, the rats were hunted to near-extinction by feral predators like cats and foxes with just one small population surviving on Franklin Island, off the coast of South Australia.

Zoos South Australia conservation manager Dr Liberty Olds was happy with how the program to save the native animal was progressing.

"Fifteen months ago, 30 Greater Stick-nest Rats were selected from a remaining wild population on the Franklin Islands off the coast of South Australia to establish an important captive-breeding program at Monarto Safari Park," Dr Olds said.

"From there, majority of those animals remained at Monarto, while some went to Adelaide Zoo or Alice Springs Desert Park in the Northern Territory.

"The rats wasted no time, with more than 40 pups being born across the sites since the program began.

"We're thrilled to say the breeding program was incredibly successful and all the animals who arrived at Mallee Cliffs last month are offspring of that original population.

"They grew brilliantly and were all given a clean bill of health from our vets before being released."

- Details: Members and visitors to Monarto Safari Park can book tickets online at www.monartosafari.com/tickets

Greater Stick-nest Rats have been bred and relocated in a new program at the safari park. Photo - supplied.

Greater Stick-nest Rats have been bred and relocated in a new program at the safari park. Photo - supplied.