Murray Bridge rolling out infrastructure

A phenomenal amount of work on infrastructure has rolled out in the Rural City of Murray Bridge this financial year.

These upgrades have visibly improved the face of the growing river town and emerging regional centre.

Rural City of Murray Bridge (RCMB) assets and infrastructure general manager, Heather Barclay and RCMB senior project manager, Fiona Warden in front of the Adelaide Road Murray Bridge Cemetery new toilet facility. Photo: Matt Welch.

Rural City of Murray Bridge (RCMB) assets and infrastructure general manager, Heather Barclay and RCMB senior project manager, Fiona Warden in front of the Adelaide Road Murray Bridge Cemetery new toilet facility. Photo: Matt Welch.

Adelaide Road at Murray Bridge Cemetery, Rural City of Murray Bridge (RCMB) assets and infrastructure general manager, Heather Barclay and RCMB senior project manager, Fiona Warden said the recent toilet facility upgrades have been planned for quite some time.

"Building these facilities is a result of council's public toilet strategy," Ms Barclay said.

"The previous council indorsed a public toilet strategy for renewal of public amenities through Murray Bridge.

"There's a range of high facility priorities, and in the last two years project manager Fiona Warden has taken carriage of implementing this strategy.

"At nine locations, we have either renewed, replaced, or built new facilities across Murray Bridge and rural centres."

The upgrades and builds of new toilet facilities are at these nine locations.

  • Adelaide Road Linear Park - New Toilet Facility
  • Wellington, Stone Wall Park - New Toilet Facility
  • Christian Reserve - Upgrade facility
  • Homburg Park - Upgrade facility
  • Monarto Recreation Centre - Upgrade facility
  • Thiele Reserve - Demolition and replace with new toilet facility
  • Long Island Reserve - Demolition and replace with new toilet facility
  • Woodlane Reserve - Demolition and replace with new toilet facility
  • Adelaide Road, Murray Bridge Cemetery - Demolition and replace with new toilet facility

More than $26million has been spent on roads, buildings, storm water, open spaces and other infrastructure projects in the past nine months, including $14 million on new works.

Chief Executive Officer Michael Sedgman said council supported private sector investment by working on projects like the Thomas Foods International (TFI) access road to forge transport connections for the rebuild, to encourage economic growth and large scale employment for the town.

"We have undertaken a significant number of projects in the past nine months; some very large that will have lasting impacts in our communities," he said.

"We are making meaningful changes in-line with what the community told us they wanted, in a strategic and financially responsible way, to create an environment where people and businesses can flourish.

"This amount of infrastructure growth in a nine month period, is unprecedented for Murray Bridge, and we are keeping that momentum going with more significant projects planned for next year."

Along with visually appealing upgrades, some excellent engineering ideas have also been implemented.

"All the infrastructure for the Murray Bridge Cemetery facility is away from the public. The system is completely locked and separate from where the public can access," Ms Barclay said.

"If you try to buy this facility off the shelf, it won't come with this back part. This was actually our own design.

"It makes maintenance much easier, doors locked from 9pm-6am, so less vandalism and the stainless steel and knee pushes improve hygiene. We've done this to suit what we need in Murray Bridge."

excellent engineering: The toilet facility on Adelaide Road, Murray Bridge Cemetery has all the functions in a separate room making maintenance much easier. Photo: Matt Welch.

excellent engineering: The toilet facility on Adelaide Road, Murray Bridge Cemetery has all the functions in a separate room making maintenance much easier. Photo: Matt Welch.

The price of the toilet builds and upgrades can differ, but the engineering advancements make these a solid investment.

"This one at Murray Bridge Cemetery is a little more expensive than others," Ms Barclay said.

"That is due to the connections to the underground sewer system.

"A finished product like this is around $180,000. It's a considerable investment by council. Whilst we don't have counters on the door, we know anecdotally which of these facilities are used heavily.

"With the cemetery being quite large, there is a demand. Our next step will to upgrade in the town itself."

Tourism appeal has also enhanced through river front projects at Sturt Reserve including the Murray Bridge Regional Rowing Centre, Murray Cods Memorial and Sturt Reserve Trail Head, at Long Island, Thiele and Avoca Dell Reserves, and the revitalisation of the Round House.

Future projects proposed for the next financial year will be outlined in the draft Rural City of Murray Bridge Annual Business Plan 2021-2022 to be released for public consultation on Tuesday 11 May 2021.

For more detail on the current list of achievements visit www.murraybridge.sa.gov.au.

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