A Murrayland scientist has won the Murraylands and Riverland Landscape Board Citizen Science Awards for Outstanding Achievement

Brian Teakle from the Murraylands was recently announced as a recipient of the 2021 Murraylands and Riverland Landscape Board Citizen Science Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Photo: Supplied.
Brian Teakle from the Murraylands was recently announced as a recipient of the 2021 Murraylands and Riverland Landscape Board Citizen Science Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Photo: Supplied.

A Murraylands scientist has won the 2021 Murraylands and Riverland Landscape Board Citizen Science Awards for Outstanding Achievement.

Brian Teakle from the Murraylands and Graham Frahn from the Riverland were recently announced as recipients of the award.

Mr Teakle was a member of the Murray Mallee Local Action Planning (LAP) Committee and is involved in many projects.

His trials looked at including native species into farming systems, applying biochar, regenerative farming, trialling native food production, increasing native wildlife habitat, agroforestry, summer multispecies cropping, and the list goes on.

Since a child, Teakle worked hard and followed his passion for his field.

"I was born on a farm at Gulnare and went to Urrbrae, then home on farm until I went back to Adelaide Boys High to do leaving and hopefully Matriculate," Mr Teakle said.

"I set out to do Ag Sc, won a commonwealth scholarship, but could not afford to do full time study.

"I was working in the summer with Alf Hannaford a co Seed cleaning and grading when my boss phoned and said that BHP Whyalla was looking for trainee engineering students being paid to study and work as well.

"I was better at maths than chemistry so went for it and became a trainee. After 10 years part time study and coming to Adelaide to work with John Shearer Farm Machinery at Kilkenny I graduated with a U of A .Bachelor of Technology, mechanical engineering degree in 1971."

Using several different trials, Mr Teakle has experimented with increasing agricultural production in line with biodiversity and landscape health. This stemmed back from when he graduated and had family in the field.

"I maintained my interest in the agricultural scene as I had cousins and family still involved," Mr Teakle said.

"After having our own Building and Plastics business we purchased the farm at Karoonda in 1991.

"We set out to drought proof the farm by establishing Old Man salt bush, 120000 plants and shelter Belts 40000plants, over a period of 20 plus years .

"We then started to encourage native grasses (Regenerative Farming) to grow and that is still what we are doing with a number of other projects operating at the same time.

"We have had encouragement and assistance from the NRM (MMLAP ) and now the Landscape Board."

Never quitting and always looking to improve, Mr Teakle still has a passion to learn.

"Over the past five years I have attended the University of Adelaide as a Audit student in Ag Sc," he said.

"I'm trying to put some science into my head to back my experiences over 81 years."

Mr Teakle has supported the Mid Murray Landcare and the South Australian Museum's western pygmy possum project and was involved in the MEGA Murray- Darling Microbat Project, surveying bat species on his property.

He is also a regular volunteer on malleefowl grid monitoring as part of the national monitoring program.

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